158
27 Aug 14 at 2 am

metinseven:

Orbitals.

(via flyinskies)

metinseven:

Orbitals.
 1963
14 Aug 14 at 8 pm

ted:

This is what sound looks like

You’ve never seen sound visualizations like this before. Evan Grant creates beautiful illustrations of what we hear by capturing the vibrations from sound waves in mediums like sand or water. This process — called cymatics — makes sound look so wonderfully alien.  

Watch the full talk here »

(via chelonaut)

 164
14 Aug 14 at 8 pm

architectureofdoom:

Viale Lombardia, Monza, Italy. Submitted by tacktix

architectureofdoom:

Viale Lombardia, Monza, Italy. Submitted by tacktix
 9
07 Aug 14 at 6 am

Self reference and formal rules allow systems to acquire meaning despite being made of meaningless elements.

 49809
04 Aug 14 at 7 pm

(Source: cybergata, via yvng-chancla)

 173543
04 Aug 14 at 7 pm

wannabeanimator:

Studio Ghibli | 1985 - 2014

After recent rumors of Studio Ghibli closing their animation department and the low box office numbers for When Marnie Was There, it was time to make an appreciation post for a company that has created true movie magic again and again. So, thank you, Studio Ghibli. Hopefully it isn’t good-bye just yet. Studio Ghibli is no longer producing animated films. So here’s to you, Ghibli, and everything you’ve given us.

(via birth--in--reverse)

 3544
04 Aug 14 at 7 pm

beingfriendly:

Lophophora williamsii

(Source: jossdebae, via 420official)

beingfriendly:

Lophophora williamsii
 117
04 Aug 14 at 7 pm

experimentsinmotion:

State of the Art: the Evolution of the Computer Chip

Published less than three decades after the first integrated circuit ever produced, Stan Augarten’s State of the Art (1983) demonstrates how rapidly the new technology developed. In a comprehensive survey ranging from the first integrated circuit of 1958a clumsy-looking, yet ground-breaking deviceto American Microsystems’ sleek S4535 High-Voltage Driver produced in 1982, the book presents computer chips like works of art, aesthetic icons of the nascent digital revolution. Perhaps most notable is the way the technology quickly evolved out of human hands and into a complex mechanized process requiring precision at an atomic level. Indeed, Jack S. Kilby built the first integrated circuit in the summer of 1958 at Texas Instruments by hand. But his groundbreaking solution, which eliminating the need for individual discrete components by making a “monolithic” circuit from one material, allowed for automation to soon take over. Today the most advanced circuits contain several hundred millions of components on an area no larger than a fingernail and must be manufactured under highly delicate conditions. Laid bare as objects, their mysterious hieroglyphics seem to reveal the intricate, arcane processes that produced them.